A MYTH OF SCIENCE

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.com

The Island of Knowledge: The Limits of Science and the Search for MeaningTHE ISLAND OF KNOWLEDGE

Written by: Marcelo Gleiser

Narration by:  William Neenan

MARCELO GLEISER (BRAZILIAN PHYSICIST AND ASTRONOMER, PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY PROFESSOR AT DARTMOUTH)
MARCELO GLEISER (BRAZILIAN PHYSICIST AND ASTRONOMER, PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY PROFESSOR AT DARTMOUTH)

the singularity is nearMarcelo Gleiser believes an A.I. singularity predicted by Ray Kurzweil is a myth of science that will be stranded on “The Island of Knowledge”.  His point is that the nature of science, human cognition, and quantum physics make computers incapable of superseding or equaling human intelligence.  The horizon of the unknown will always be present for human beings, even with computational advances.  Gleiser implies that the computer will only be a tool of humankind to explore the unknown.

Gleiser notes the nature of science is to explain natural phenomena. Sciences’ explanations create an island of knowledge that is like Socrates’ cave; i.e. a cave for humanity that only reveals shadows of reality.  Human beings cannot leave the cave because every scientific discovery only leads to another question about shadows that represent the real thing.  Gleiser prepares one for that conclusion by recounting the history of great scientists like Isaac Newton, James Maxwell, Max Planck, Earnest Rutherford, Albert Einstein, Edwin Schroedinger, Werner Heisenberg, Paul Dirac, and others.  Each of these scientists contributes to “The Island of Knowledge” but each raises more questions about phenomena that remain shadows of nature’s reality.  Gleiser acknowledges that Newton and Einstein sharpen shadowy outlines of nature’s reality but each fails to discover absolute truth.  Newton misses the fundamental truth of time.  Einstein misses the truth of quantum physics.  Newton’s time is relative and Einstein’s presumed certainties are probabilities.

SIR ISAAC NEWTON (1642-1727)
SIR ISAAC NEWTON (1642-1727)
ALBERT EINSTEIN (1879-1955)
ALBERT EINSTEIN (1879-1955)

Gleiser argues that human cognition is limited by “The Island of Knowledge” because cognition is influenced by the mind’s senses.  Consciousness entails life’s experiences and interprets events within a closed system of understanding.

KARL POPPER (1902-1994)
KARL POPPER (1902-1994)

For example, history is reported with facts that are selected by the historian.  The facts may be accurate but not all facts of the past are reported and thereby history becomes a shadow of the truth.   In science, experiments do not prove a truth; i.e. experiments only eliminate false positives, leaving only another experiment to disprove another presumed truth.  Experiments theoretically get one closer to a truth but the truth remains a shadow because the new truth has to be explored by further experiment.  As Karl Popper notes: “In so far as a scientific statement speaks about reality, it must be falsifiable; and in so for as it is not falsifiable, it does not speak about reality.”

FRANKENSTEIN
FRANKENSTEIN

Finally, Gleiser explains that artificial intelligence will never supersede or equal human intelligence because natural phenomena are found to be probabilistic and not defined by yes and no, or ones and zeros.  Artificial Intelligence is a misnomer.  AI is a manmade construct, subject to “The Island of Knowledge” created by human beings.  Gleiser argues there are serious dangers in expansion of AI because it reduces complexity to yes and no answers that increase potential for errant action.  The implication is that a computer that programs itself becomes a Frankenstein; not a sentient being, but a computing creation that disrupts, if not destroys, human life based on shadows of unverifiable truths.  The idea of a Turing Computer that can know the origin of life is as specious as belief in the myth of the Holy Grail.

Gleiser touches on the mysteries of “spooky action at a distance” which challenge Einstein’s dictum that nothing exceeds the speed of light. Gleiser recounts experiments that prove “spooky action at a distance” are real. Experiments with “spooky action at a distance” open a new field of inquiry.  “Spooky action at a distance” challenges belief that human beings will ever have a theory of everything.  Gleiser believes “The Island of Knowledge” is as close as humanity will ever get to a theory of everything and it will always be a shadow of nature’s truth.

Gleiser is saying pursuit of nature’s truth is important but precise truth is unattainable.  He argues that a final truth will never be found because discoveries of science will only lead to more questions, more experiments, and better tools of measurement. Nature’s truth will always be beyond human understanding; i.e. at best, nature’s truth will only be shadows of reality with sharper outlines.

Gleiser is quick to point out that this conclusion is not meant to discourage scientific exploration.  He believes human beings have an innate desire to understand nature. The life of humans suggests pursuit of nature’s essence is true of all cultures because of a common desire for money, power, and prestige; i.e. motivations that are magnified by scientific discovery.

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