BIRDS FLY, SO WHY CAN’T I

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.com

The Wright BrothersThe Wright Brothers

Written by: David McCullough

Narrated by: David McCullough

DAVID McCULLOUGH (TWO TIME PULIZER PRIZE WINNER)
DAVID McCULLOUGH (TWO TIME PULIZER PRIZE WINNER)

“The Wright Brothers” must have wondered—Birds fly, so why can’t I?  David McCullough writes and narrates a memoir of the Wright Brothers that perfectly turns wonder into reality.  Orville and Wilbur Wright are the first to design, build, and fly an airplane that demonstrates human control of flight.  They were not the first humans to fly, but they were the first to fly like birds; i.e. flying with nature, and intent.  Before the Wright brothers, flying is left to man’s faith in God and luck; after the Wright brothers, flying is firmly within the grasp of humanity.

Two farm boys are raised in a family of seven (a mother, father, sister, and four brothers).  Neither Orville, or Wilbur are college graduates.  Both are born to a mother (Susan Catherine Koerner) who graduates from Hartford College as the top mathematician in her class. This is a woman who becomes a housewife to an ordained minister.  She exemplifies independence, intelligence, persistence, and selflessness. Through nature and nurture, Orville and Wilbur become the talk of Dayton, Ohio, Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Paris, Washington DC, and, eventually, the wide world.

WRIGHT BROTHERS FAMILY (COMPOSITE PHOTO, LEFT TO RIGHT-WILBUR, KATHARINE, SUSAN, LORIN, BISHOP MILTON, REUCHIN, AND ORVILLE)
WRIGHT BROTHERS FAMILY (COMPOSITE PHOTO, LEFT TO RIGHT-WILBUR, KATHARINE, SUSAN, LORIN, BISHOP MILTON, REUCHIN, AND ORVILLE)
WILBUR WRIGHT AT AGE 42
WILBUR WRIGHT AT AGE 42
ORVILLE WRIGHT AT AGE 36
ORVILLE WRIGHT AT AGE 36

Wilbur is a student athlete and scholar in high school.  He goes to Hartford College, like his mother, but (unlike his mother) never graduates.  Orville is the younger of the two by 4 years.  Orville never finishes high school.

McCullough describes the boys as tinkerers with ambition and a burning desire to understand how birds fly.  With extraordinary observational skill, hard work, and persistence, Wilbur and Orville observe birds in flight, build and tinker with flying machines, and meticulously repeat experiments in human flight.

With income from a bicycle business, started in Dayton, Ohio, they begin designing their first glider.  After completing their design, they make parts and assemble their air vehicles at their bicycle shop.  They search for an area of the country that has the wind and landing characteristics they need to test their glider.  They are invited to an area of North Carolina because of the wind and sand characteristics of the area.  Their first flight is on October 5, 1900 near Kitty Hawk but it is flown more as a kite than airplane.  It has no pilot.  After the first experiment, Wilbur becomes the pilot, while helpers tether the glider from the ground.

WRIGHT UNPOWERED AIRCRAFT
WRIGHT UNPOWERED AIRCRAFT

These first flights lead the brothers back to the drawing board for control-feature re-design.

The brothers return in 1901, with a new glider.  The new design, allows the wing tips of the wings to flex to allow adjustments in flight.  They create a wind tunnel to help with a re-design of glider controls. They find the flexing refines control of the glider in their Dayton shop where the re-design and reassembly occur.  They add a rear rudder to improve the steering capability of the flyer.  At this point, McCullough explains that the brothers begin flying in earnest to improve their skill in maneuvering the glider.  Orville and Wilbur realize earlier failures (by themselves and others) will be repeated by pilots without extensive experience with aircraft controls.  McCullough reinforces the historic truth of the Wright brothers’ invention of the first airplane. Without the brother’s creative control features, airplanes would be too dangerous to fly.

WRIGHT'S 1903 FLYER
WRIGHT’S 1903 FLYER
CHARLES TAYLOR (1868-1956, DESIGNED THE FIRST ENGINE FOR THE WRIGHT BROTHER'S AIRPLANE)
CHARLES TAYLOR (1868-1956, DESIGNED THE FIRST ENGINE FOR THE WRIGHT BROTHER’S AIRPLANE)

Once the aerodynamics of flight are understood, the Wright brothers turn to the idea of a motor to complete their vision of human flight.  Searching the nation for a light weight engine to power their glider, they find no engine fits the bill.  By good fortune, the Wright brothers are acquainted with Charles Taylor.

WRIGHT'S 1903 FLYER ENGINE
WRIGHT’S 1903 FLYER ENGINE

They hire Taylor to run their bicycle shop while they are refining their gliders.  Taylor happens to be a master mechanic.  He hand-builds an engine to power the first airplane motor by boring a block of aluminum for pistons to provide 12 horsepower to the Wright’s first airplane.  On December 17, 1903, the first flight of a motorized airplane (an airplane with directional controls) takes place at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

KATHARINE WRIGHT (1874-1929, SISTER OF WILBUR AND ORVILLE WRIGHT)
KATHARINE WRIGHT (1874-1929, SISTER OF WILBUR AND ORVILLE WRIGHT)

McCullough notes that neither Orville or Wilbur ever marry.  They are a close family, raised by a loving father who is often absent because of his Bishopric duties and a mother who surprises local residents with her ability to manage the household, repair broken tools, and raise self-reliant children.  The brother’s sister, Katharine Wright is the only child to graduate from college.  She becomes the boy’s surrogate mother when their birth-mother is invalided in 1886 and dies in 1889.  Katherine becomes the first woman to fly as Wilbur’s passenger in Paris.

ORVILLE WRIGHT (1871-1948)
ORVILLE WRIGHT (1871-1948)

In the many flights Orville and Wilbur take, there are several crashes. The worst crash is when Orville is demonstrating their latest airplane to the Army.  According to McCullough, the crash is caused by a mechanical failure that kills an Army Lieutenant as a passenger on Orville’s flight.  Orville, nearly killed, is nursed back to health by Katharine.

CRASHED ARMY DEMONSTRATION FLIGHT THAT NEARLY TAKES ORVILLE WRIGHT'S LIFE AND ENDS THE PASSENGER'S LIFE, LIEUTENANT THOMAS SELFRIDGE.
CRASHED ARMY DEMONSTRATION FLIGHT THAT NEARLY TAKES ORVILLE WRIGHT’S LIFE AND ENDS THE PASSENGER’S LIFE, LIEUTENANT THOMAS SELFRIDGE.

In most of Orville’s and Wilbur’s flights, they fly separately to assure the continuation of their company should one or the other have an accident.  As fate would have it, Wilbur dies from typhoid in 1912.

Orville lives until 1948.  Together, these two boys create a company in 1909 that sells airplanes to the U. S. Army and a French syndicate.  Orville decides to sell the company in 1915 but stays involved in aeronautics for the remainder of his life.  He becomes a member of the Board of Directors for NASA.

Several lawsuits were brought to challenge patents created by the Wright brothers on their airplane designs; none of the challenges succeed.  Wilbur aggressively protects the company patents.

McCullough implies “The Wright Brothers” story is proof of the truth of the American Dream.  With hard work, persistence, and intelligence, success is every American’s opportunity.  In history, ghosts of past and present, challenge that belief.  But, for white Americans in the early twentieth century, the dream is made real by McCullough’s entertaining and informative story about the Wright family.

Views All Time
Views All Time
Views Today
Views Today
(Visited 46 time, 1 visit today)

Always good to hear from you!