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NEVADA MINING

MINING-BIG BUSINESS IN NEVADA

By Chet Yarbrough

VESION OF THIS ARTICLE POSTED “LAS VEGAS REVIEW JOURNAL”

http://www.reviewjournal.com/jobs

Nevada mining makes an outsized contribution to the State’s economy.  Tourism, gaming, mining, and ranching are Nevada’s “big four” industry groups.   According to nevadaworkforce.com, Nevada’s mining industry increased employment by 12.2% between Q2-2011 and Q2-2012, the largest percentage gain in any of Nevada’s four main industries.

Over 15,000 people are directly or indirectly employed in the Nevada mining industry.  Average annual wages are estimated at $88,000. NMA estimates Nevada taxes collected on worker contributions, and mining industry sales are near $417 million in 2011.  (Their calculation is based on a combination of state, county, and federal taxes.)

MICHAEL DOYLE - EXECUTIVE VP, OPERATIONS OF AMERICAN VANDIUM CORPORATION
MICHAEL DOYLE – EXECUTIVE VP, OPERATIONS OF AMERICAN VANDIUM CORPORATION

American Vanadium Corp. plans to develop the Gibellini Mine Project in Nevada, the only vanadium mine operation in the United States.    Michael Doyle, Executive Vice President of Operations in Sparks, Nevada said, “The projected life of the mine is 7 years with significant additional resources currently being evaluated.”  In 2011, Bill Radvak, CEO of American Vanadium, said “We are in the permitting phase.”  In a best case projection, the mine would be open in late 2013.

The planned location for the mine is 25 miles south of Eureka, Nevada—off State Road 379, 325 miles north of Las Vegas and 346 miles east of Reno.  Though not near Nevada’s big cities, it will impact employment in the Eureka, Ely, and Elko communities.

GIBELLINI MINE PROJECT IN NEVADA
GIBELLINI MINE PROJECT IN NEVADA

American Vanadium estimates employment of 130 people at the time of peak development with operating personnel averaging 91 employees during mine operation.  Doyle said, “The initial capital investment is estimated at nearly $100,000,000 with infrastructure costs, including on site and offsite development for project access, material transport, water, sewer, and administrative office construction.”  The new mine will have wide impact on the entire state with purchase and/or lease of manufactured material and equipment for development and operation of the mine.  Estimated tax payments from operation of the mine are $12.3 million, excluding tax contribution from employee spending.

VANDIUM FLOW BATTERY SCHEMATIC
VANDIUM FLOW BATTERY SCHEMATIC

Vanadium, discovered in 1801, is a naturally occurring chemical element.  Its chemical characteristics give it wide use in industrial and medical industries.  Without knowing what uses will be made of vanadium from the Gibellini mine, it is interesting that American Vanadium recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Germany’s Gildemeister AG, a maker of vanadium redox flow rechargeable batteries.  A representative of American Vanadium explained, “Rechargeable batteries for electrical-storage offers renewable energy production and optimization of the nation’s energy grid.”  A successful demonstration of a vanadium redox flow battery was shown in the 1980s.  In these batteries, the energy is actually stored in the vanadium, which represents 40% of their cost.

GALVANIC ACTION DIAGRAM--PRINCIPLE OF VANADIUM BATTERY FUNCTION
GALVANIC ACTION DIAGRAM–PRINCIPLE OF VANADIUM BATTERY FUNCTION

American Vanadium Corp. will be a welcome addition to Nevada’s mining industry.  Gibellini mine production has the potential for creating ancillary businesses that may directly or indirectly benefit Nevada’s economy.

MOLYCORP MOUNTAIN PASS MINE
MOLYCORP MOUNTAIN PASS MINE

Not far from Nevada’s southwest border, about 100 miles from Las Vegas, Molycorp is planning to reinvest in a rare-earth mine.  There are 17 rare earth metals in the periodic table.  These rare earth metals are important chemical elements in everything from Mercury-vapor lamps to lasers that are used for both medical and industrial applications.  Ninety percent of these rare earth metals are produced in China where 65 percent of the metals are consumed.  Uses of rare metals vary from smartphones, electric car batteries to missiles and energy facilities.

Molycorp is a world-wide company with 26 locations in 11 countries.  It employs 2,700 people.  Molycorp mines 13 of the 17 rare earth metals.  It began mining for bastnasite, a rare earth ore, at Mountain Pass mine on the California/Nevada border in 1949.

Molycorp is planning to re-invest an estimated $532 million in the Mountain Pass Mine.  After a nine-year hiatus, the mine re-opened in 2011.  The rare earth metals sought in the reinvestment are Cerium, Lanthanum, and Yttrium (all found in basnasite).  Cerium is used in Carbon-Arc lights to illuminate movie sets and projector screens.  It is also an element in the petroleum refinement process.  Lanthanum is used in glass and camera lenses.  It is also used in X-ray films and different types of lasers.   Yttrium is used in microwave filters, laser systems, and alloys of chromium, aluminium (a chemical element in the boron group), or magnesium because of its strengthening qualities.

Mountain Pass is the only rare-earth-metals mine in America.  The reinvestment plan for the mine is to employ 200 people who will operate 3 shifts on a 24/7 basis.  Many of these employees will commute from Las Vegas.  Molycorp’s website shows they are presently looking for a Journeyman Plant Mechanic, Mine Operator, Plant Mechanic A, Plant Mechanic B, Journeyman Electrician, and Operator Trainee.  The molycorp.com website is a good place to learn about company careers, benefits, values, and history.

COMSTOCK LODE-Remains of the Combination Shaft, 2011. The Combination Shaft, located near Virginia City, began in 1875 when the mine owners combined their efforts to sink a shaft to explore the Comstock Lode at a greater depth. The Combination was the deepest shaft ever sunk on the Comstock, reaching a depth of 3,250 feet. It was used until 1886.
COMSTOCK LODE-Remains of the Combination Shaft, 2011. The Combination Shaft, located near Virginia City, began in 1875 when the mine owners combined their efforts to sink a shaft to explore the Comstock Lode at a greater depth. The Combination was the deepest shaft ever sunk on the Comstock, reaching a depth of 3,250 feet. It was used until 1886.

Nevada is a storied mining state.  The 1858 Comstock Lode opens silver mining in Nevada.  In the 1870s, gold is discovered in Eureka County but the low-grade deposits are too small to create much excitement; at least until 1961, when Newmont Mining Corporation moves into the Carlin area and begins producing gold from low-grade deposits.  In the late 1970s, when gold prices were deregulated, gold mining in Nevada boomed.  Newmont Mining Corporation continues major mining operations in Nevada.  They employ 40,000 people worldwide.   In 2011, 14 open-pit mines and 4 underground mines were operating in the Carlin area.  On March 8, 2013, Newmont’s website lists 38 job openings in Nevada.

By 2009, Nevada is producing 79% of all the gold in the United States.  In 2007, 6,037,000 ounces of gold were produced in Nevada.  The most prolific gold producing mine in Nevada is the Betze-Post Mine, owned and operated by Barrick Gold, the world’s leading gold producer.

BETZE-POST OPEN PIT MINE
BETZE-POST OPEN PIT MINE

The mine is operated by Barrick Goldstrike Mines, Inc.  It is located in the upper middle part of the State, 75 miles southwest of Elko.   They have 1503 full time employees, 200 contract employees, and produce 1,819,115 ounces of gold and 117,750 ounces of silver.  On March 8, 2013, Barrick Mines website lists 57 job openings in Nevada.

Another gold mining company in Nevada is Scorpio Gold Corporation that holds a 70% interest in the Mineral Ridge Gold Mine (Waterton Global Value L.P. owns the other 30%).  The Mineral Ridge Gold Mine is approximately 217 miles northeast of Las Vegas.  It is one of the smaller gold and silver mining operations in the State.  It produces both gold and silver with most recent production showing 13,951 ounces of gold and 7,907 ounces of silver.  The Mineral Ridge Mine employs 46 full-time personnel and 2 contract employees.

An often overlooked and underappreciated mining operation in the United States is sand and gravel mining.  It is certainly one of the most accessible natural resources.  It is a critical component of the construction industry.  Construction sand and gravel valued at $6.4 billion was produced by 6,500 mining operations in 50 states in 2012 (2013 USGS Minerals Information Report).  Sand and gravel is used in road bases, concrete aggregates, blocks, bricks, pipes, plaster and many other construction industry materials.

 In 2008, Sand and Gravel was the third most valuable commodity produced in Nevada.  Sand and gravel was valued at $225 million.   The most important source of sand and gravel aggregate is in the Lone Mountain area in northwest Las Vegas.  One of the five biggest producers in 2008 was Impact Sand and Gravel.  Each of the big five in Nevada produced more than 900,000 tons of aggregate.

IMPACT SAND AND GRAVEL OPERATION
IMPACT SAND AND GRAVEL OPERATION

Impact Sand and Gravel, located in Las Vegas, started in 1996 as Cactus Sand and Gravel with incorporation as Impact Sand and Gravel in 1999. Alora Edwards, in the Recruiting Administration Department explained, “Currently, there are about 60 employees at Impact Sand and Gravel.”  She said, “That includes in office and out in the field with approximately 45 full-time employees and 15 part-time.”  All full-time employees have medical insurance.

When asked what skill sets are required at Impact Sand & Gravel, Edwards said, “The skill set we look for in an individual varies depending on the position but with all of our employees or candidates, we look for people who match our company and core values.”  There is a social consciousness in the employment practice of Impact Sand and Gravel.   She explained, “We have hired several homeless people to fill security and labor positions.”

Just as in any mining operation, Impact looks for equipment operators, mechanics, accountants, admins, leaders, scale house operators; etc.  Edwards said, “At the moment, our most difficult position to fill is the Mechanics position.”  She adds, “In general, we do have some difficulty finding qualified individuals to fill our higher Management positions.”

Impact operates four quarry sites in the Las Vegas area– one near Cactus and Maryland Parkway, one at Rail Road Pass, one at Lone Mountain, and one in Boulder City.  When asked about how the business is affected by the economy, Edwards said, “The economy hurt almost everyone in 2009 and 2010.”  She said, “Fuel prices and the lack of construction have been the biggest challenges, ” and added, “Obama care is expected to more than double our health insurance costs.”

In terms of direct employment, Nevada’s mining industry is at the bottom of nonfarm payroll employment but the industry directly employs 16,300 full-time employees according to the Nevada Workforce Research and Analysis Bureau. Mining is at the top of employment percentage increases on a year-to-year comparison of the four major industries in Nevada.

The Bureau of Land Management reports, “In 2011, the top four gold producing countries in the world were #1 China, #2 Australia, #3 USA, and #4 South Africa.   They go on to say that “Nevada has the largest mineral materials program in the Bureau in terms of volume and value of mineral materials disposed.”   In production, Nevada is ranked (“Gold Investing” newsletter -January 13, 2011) as the fourth largest gold producer in the world.  “In 2011, Nevada’s gold mining industry produced approximately $8.8 billion in gross revenue” (Gannett report-March 5, 2013).

The Nevada Mining Association estimates that “Since 1990, mining has contributed more than $100 million each year to Nevada and local economies.”

Mining is big business in Nevada.

(A Version of this Article is Posted in the “Las Vegas Review Journal” 3/24/13)

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SKIN IN THE GAME

habitat for humanitySKIN IN THE GAME

By Chet Yarbrough

3/7/13

It’s 6:00 A.M.– getting ready for red-shirt volunteers at a Habitat for Humanity’ construction site.  It is a sunshiny day in September 2009 that will push heat above 100 degrees by 12:30.

The Project Manager prepares a work site for a handful of experienced group leaders that will help future homeowners, their friends, and a dozen inexperienced volunteers build a house for a working family that needs a home but cannot afford a conventional mortgage.   Habitat for Humanity is an international success in the shelter business because every home buyer has “skin in the game”; i.e. every home-built to be sold to a working family is partly built by that family.

At 61 years of age, it’s a dream job with little stress and a work environment that employees feel privileged to experience.  The privilege is in the joy that comes from working with people who need shelter and volunteers that want to do good for others.

Unlike past early mornings, the Project Manager is feeling oddly weak as he opens job boxes, lays out tools, brews a pot of coffee, and sets water out for the day’s work.  After sitting down, the weakness disappears and the day goes on but the Project Manager makes an appointment to see Dr. Feelgood, his general practitioner, to get some advice on what happened earlier.  (Doctor’s names are fictitious and are not meant to either praise or blame any real person.)

Dr. Feelgood gives the Project Manager an examination and refers him to a cardiologist.  The Cardiologist, Dr. Dewit, examines the PM and schedules him for a stress test and electrocardiogram.  Dr. Dewit is new to the PM but is recommended by Dr. Feelgood which gives the PM some confidence in Dr. Dewit’s ability.  In a follow-up appointment, Dr. Dewit recommends an angiogram be done.  This is the second time the PM has met Dr. Dewit.  Dr. Dewit explains the procedure which involves being anesthetized, and injected with a dye that is squirted into a femoral artery in a patient’s groin.  The PM explains to Dr. Dewit that he does not want a stent automatically inserted if blockage is found in an artery.  The PM wants to discuss the results with Dr. Dewit before a stent is installed.  Dr. Dewit reluctantly agrees.

Dr. Dewit reviews x-rays and concludes that a stent is the solution for an apparent blocked artery.  The PM reluctantly agrees. The doctor operates, once again. Dr. Dewit, for the first time in his career, is unable to force the stent through the blocked artery.

The PM recovers from the second trip to the operating room.  Dr. Dewit looks at the x-rays again. He advises the PM that he missed the fact that collateral arteries developed around the occluded artery and were serving that part of the heart that had been served by the diseased artery.  The stent was not necessary.

Revelation #1—Doctors are not wholly good or bad; they, like all human beings, are motivated by money, power, and prestige.  Doctors make mistakes.  Patients make mistakes. Human beings are not immortal and life is ephemeral.  Luck, both good and bad, accompanies good and bad decisions made by both doctors and patients.

The former PM is now a retired, 65-year-old, seeing a new general practitioner and a new cardiologist.  In follow-up examinations, there are some changes in his electrocardiogram with some chest tightening when the PM hikes at higher altitudes.  No stent yet but the new cardiologist wants to do another angiogram with authorization from the PM to implant a stent if further blockage is revealed.  So far, the PM’s decision on another angiogram and possible stent is no.  Stay tuned because Dr. Goodforme, the new cardiologist, wants to see the patient again in 6 weeks.

Life is a gamble but it is a patient’s gamble, not a practitioners’.  Who knows what the proportional motivation is for a practitioner?  A patient’s motivation is health which allows for continued pursuit of money, power, and prestige.  A doctor’s motivation is the same; only diminished or increased by the next willing or un-willing patient, but it is the patient who has skin in the game.

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“FOOTPRINTS”

“FOOTPRINTS” (Click Frank Sinatra-New York New York above while reading this article to get the feeling of being in NY.)

By Chet Yarbrough

10/25/12

(This blog entry was made based on a trip to New York, one and a half weeks before the arrival of Hurricane Sandy.)

NEW YORK
NEW YORK’S CURRENT SKYLINE

NEW YORK ARRIVAL- HURRICANE SANDY OCTOBER, 2012:

SCENES OF NEW YORK BEFORE & DURING OCTOBER 2012 HURRICANE SANDY:

Triumph and tragedy are footprints in time that are reflected in two of New York’s more recent attractions.

AIRCRAFT CARRIER INTREPID (NEAR BATTERY PARK)

 

New York’s latest memorial exhibits are monuments to America’s past and future; i.e. America’s “…giant leap for mankind” in the space shuttle exhibit at the “Intrepid” museum, and the Trade Center memorial at Liberty and Greenwood, near Battery Park.

EAST TOWER MEMORIAL
EAST TOWER MEMORIAL

These New York’ memorials exemplify great events in American history; each, in its own way, good and bad.  There is the spectacular achievement of space travel and horrible disasters of “Columbia” and “Challenger”.  There is the tragic slaughter of 3,000 innocents on 9/11; immortalized by a memorial to the lost; built on footprints of the twin tower’ foundations.

WEST TOWER MEMORIAL
WEST TOWER MEMORIAL

There is the symbolic triumph of new skyscrapers; i.e. “Freedom Tower” and neighboring buildings that tell the world, “Americans are free and not afraid!”.

FREEDOM TOWER AND NEIGHBORING BUILDING AT THE TWIN TOWER MEMORIAL SITE
FIRST FOOTPRINT ON THE MOON (NEIL ARMSTRONG)
FIRST FOOTPRINT ON THE MOON (NEIL ARMSTRONG)

Neil Alden Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, died on August 25, 2012.

NEIL ARMSTRONG

He spent 8 days and 14 hours in space, on the Gemini and Apollo missions, becoming a timeless symbol of American triumph.  The “Eagle”, the lunar lander’s name on the Apollo 11 mission, landed on the moon on July 20, 1969 and departed July 21, 1969.  Ten different astronauts repeated the trip on 5 different missions between 1969 and 1972.

1960 LAUNCH OF THE FIRST AMERICAN EARTH ORBITAL FLIGHT
CAPSULE LIKE THAT FLOWN BY ARMSTRONG & ALDRIN
SPACE CAPSULE AT INTREPID MUSEUM

The idea of two men sitting in a 4.2’ x 4.2’ x 4.2’ cabin, at the top of a 364 foot high (the Statue of Liberty is 152 feet high) Saturn rocket,  is overwhelming; particularly, when one actually sits in an Apollo mock-up of the capsule at the New York’ “Intrepid” exhibit.

On September 17, 1976, the first full-scale prototype of the Space Shuttle is completed.  It is called the “Enterprise”; named after the “Star Trek” TV series.  Though the “Enterprise” never leaves earth’s orbit, it is the earth-bound test vehicle for future shuttles.

THE ENTERPRISE @ THE INTREPID MUSEUM

Space Shuttles are meant to be reusable space delivery vehicles (trucks) for manned space stations.  The shuttle bay could carry a 28,000 lb. cargo with two to eight people, six of which would be mission or payload specialists.  Between April 12, 1981 and July 21, 2011, 135 missions were scheduled; 133 successfully completed their mission with loss of 1 at launch and another when returning to earth.  “Challenger” failed at launch and “Columbia” failed at re-entry.

CHALLENGER DISASTER

Greg Jarvis, Christa McAuliffe, Ronald McNair, Elison Onizuka, Judith Resnik, Michael Smith, and Dick Scobee died in the “Challenger” mission (January 28, 1986).

CHALLENGER CREW (Names not coordinated with above list.)
COLUMBIA CREW (Names not coordinated with picture-RICK HUSBAND,WILLIAM McCool ,MICHAEL ANDERSON,KALPANA CHAWLA,DAVID BROWN,LAUREL CLARK, and ILLAN RAMON DIED IN THE “COLUMBIA” RE-ENTRY FEBRUARY 1,2003.)

(After the “Columbia” tragedy on Feb 1, 2003, several modifications were made to the “Enterprise”’ design but it looks the same.)

When visiting the 9/11 memorial, new feelings express themselves; i.e. a feeling of reverence, sadness, a feeling of pride for brave men and women that came to help, and a feeling of human insignificance.

VIEWER DISCRETION ADVISED:

Seeing the name of a fire-fighters’  engine number on a granite monument surrounding the foot print of the twin towers makes some cry, and some look away.  One that looks at surrounding buildings and massive twin tower’ footprints feels small and vulnerable.  Seeing a battered fire battalion commander’s safety helmet reminds one of brave fire and police personnel that risk their lives to protect and rescue people. 

The massive size of the two building footprints and the rushing water that drains into gaping maws at the center of each monument reminds one of how big and haphazard the world is and how an individual life is in danger of falling into nothingness.

EAST TOWER MEMORIAL

TIME LAPSE VIDEO OF CONSTRUCTION @ THE 9/11 MEMORIAL:

At the same time one feels renewed; i.e. revivified by the “Freedom Tower” and a neighboring building rising above the skyline to let the world know, 3000 people did not die in vain.  These new buildings send the message that 3000 deaths are not a harbinger of an end but footprints to a future.

New York will rebound from Hurricane Sandy with the same energy, pride, and permanence that it has had from its beginning as a settlement in 1624 to its inevitable revitalization after Hurricane Sandy in 2012.  There are many more footprints in New York City’s future.

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ART IN NEW YORK-1

THE NEW GUIDE TO “THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART”

By Thomas P. Campbell, Director

Distributed by Yale University Press 2012

 A couple of weeks ago, the “New York Times” wrote an article about a new edition of a Guide to the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

As mentioned in an earlier post, a future trip to New York would more closely review some of what was photographed at the museum by this peripatetic voyeur.  This new guide is a beginning of that closer look.

“THE GUIDE” is under $24, with excellent pictures of many of the museum art works and brief descriptions of their origin, size, provenance, and content.   “THE GUIDE” offers information missed when personal photographs are taken at the Museum.  It also provides a source for web search information that contextualizes art on display.

TRIUMPH OF DIONYSUS AND THE SEASONS
TRIUMPH OF DIONYSUS AND THE SEASONS

This marble Sarcophagus is titled “Triumph of Dionysus and the Seasons”.  In Greek mythology, Dionysus is a god of chaos and, like seasons of a year with snow storms, floods, droughts, and unpredictability, Dionysus represents arbitrariness, giving and taking life by chance.  In Roman mythology, Dionysus becomes Bacchus, the communicator between the living and the dead.  The Sarcophagus is carved in the Late Imperial Roman period, between 260 and 270 A.D. which places it in the crises years of the Roman Empire.   It is generally classified as funerary art.  It is decorated with forty human and animal figures that depict the four seasons; i.e. from left to right—Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall.

JOSEPH PULITZER (1847-1911)

Joseph Pulitzer gave it to the museum in 1955.  Pulitzer, a newspaper publisher that died in 1911, is best known for posthumously creating the Pulitzer Prize. Pulitzer owned two newspapers (The Saint Louis Dispatch & The New York Herald) and became an elected member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York’s 9th district.

The Farnese Table below is noted to have been made in 1569, donated by the Harris Brisbane Dick Fund in 1957.  It is believed to have been designed by an Italian architect, Jacopo Barozzi da Vignola, for the Farnese Palace in Rome.  The fleurs-de-lis (lilies) are emblems of the Farnese family.

THE FARNESE TABLE DESIGNED BY JACOPO BAROZZI da VIGNOLA 1565-1573
THE FARNESE TABLE DESIGNED BY JACOPO BAROZZI da VIGNOLA-ROME, ABOUT 1565-1573

 

FLEURS-DE-LIS--SYMBOL OF THE FARNESE FAMILY
FLEURS-DE-LIS–SYMBOL OF THE FARNESE FAMILY

Cardinal Alessandro Farnese lived from 1520 to 1589.  He was the grandson of Pope Paul III and became a great collector and patron of the arts.  Presumably, his family either commissioned or purchased the table.  Jacopo Barozzi da Vignola, employed by the Farnese family, had once tutored with Michelangelo.  The table is inlaid with various marbles and semiprecious stones surrounding Egyptian (some say Oriental) alabaster in the center.

CARDINAL FARNESE (1520-1589) PAINTED BY TITIAN

Harris Brisbane Dick, deceased 1917, was the owner of a book publishing business, now defunct, called Dick & Fitzgerald.  At his death, Dick directed that $1,328,257 of his estate be set up to be used to buy ‘desirable objects of art’ for the MMofA.

“The Metropolitan Museum of Art Guide” will be periodically reviewed as a source document to explore the web-based history of what pictures are taken of exhibits in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; i.e. just for the love of art and its spectacular location in America’s brightness-lights City.  [contact-form-7 id=”1710″ title=”Contact form 1″]

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NEW YORK, NEW YORK

WHAT IS IT ABOUT NEW YORK?

For several years, in the month of October, the Yarbroughs visit New York.  In 2011, the trip involves a walk from the Theater District to Central Park, past Rockefeller Center, and into the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

 

 

 

 

Spending a day in New York can be inexpensive once you get past the cost of air fare and a place to stay.

The New York Metropolitan Museum’s massive structure intimidates a first time visitor but being there once creates the wish to be there again.

So much to see in one day with little time to catalogue; so the goal this year is to wander through a maze of exhibits and take pictures of what seduces imagination.  Next year, a resolution is to make more sense of this immersion in art and history.

Statues of human figures, carved in 27 B.C., are so detailed and life like that they seem capable of stepping off their pedestals to tell visitors of their lives in antiquity.

This sculpture of Dionysius illustrates an ancient artist’s ability to transform a block of rock into a work of art.

Venturing into another room of exhibits, the visitor is transported to a different era, different culture, and a different form of art.  Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas are on display a few steps from the Roman and Greek exhibition.

Artist materials are different because the environment is different.

Ceremonial dugouts with elaborate wood carvings are tributes to an island culture that venerated art with the same creative energy as the Greeks and Romans.

These 12 to 15 foot tall wood statues are intricately carved, phallic symbols of something mysterious and titillating.

These figures below seem to run the gamut from familial to amusing to royal.

Next, off to the classic and modern art section of the museum.  There is a mixture of feelings in seeing the paintings of renowned artists from Van Gogh, Picasso, Mondrian, Pollock, and Warhohl to so many names that are well known but poorly appreciated because of one’s aesthetic limitations.  Putting ignorance aside, who can look and not be amazed by the geometry, beauty, and color of these paintings?

 

There is an eclectic collection of art at the Museum.  No imagination goes un-tickled by one of the Museum’s galleries.

This is only a glimpse of what  New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art has to offer.    Georgia O’keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz Exhibition

Next October cannot come too  soon. This is a “don’t miss it” experience.

 

 

 

 

 

A GREAT WAY TO SPEND THE DAY–WHAT DO YOU THINK?

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